Wednesday, December 01, 2010

IN THE TIME OF SEGREGATION::THE MONTPELIER TRAIN DEPOT EXHIBIT

 MONTPELIER TRAIN DEPOT,ROSA PARKS,SEGREGATION

“Rosa Parks was born on February 4, 1913 in Tuskegee, Alabama. Today marks the 55th anniversary of the civil disobedience on December 1, 1955 when the seamstress in Montgomery, Alabama, became a pivotal symbol in America's civil rights movement.” READ MORE. So for today a visit to the  Montpelier train station, which sits on the grounds of James Madison's Montpelier estate. The train station is now a small museum that depicts the era of segregation. READ MORE

seg8  Rosa Louise McCauley Parks (February 4, 1913 – October 24, 2005) was an African American civil rights activist, whom the U.S. Congress later called "the first lady of civil rights", and "the mother of the freedom movement".READ MORE

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There is a ROSA PARKS MUSEUM on the campus of Troy University Montgomery campus CLICK

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It wasn't until the 1964 Civil Rights Act that all public accommodations nationwide were desegregated. 1964 was the year I graduated from high school. Today I find it hard to imagine.

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There is an  International Civil Rights Center and Museum that uses the former F.W. Woolworth store in downtown Greensboro to remind people what segregation was like and how change was wrought in the way African-Americans were treated every day of their lives. READ MORE

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You can also tour the JIM CROW MUSEUM at Ferris State University. CLICK.

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Then just across the road from the train depot you have::::

gilmore READ POST

mypictr_Facebook Thanks for stopping by and THANK YOU ROSA PARKS.


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VISIT MONTPELIER THE HOME OF JAMES MADISON

7 comments:

Hocking Hills Gardener said...

Since I am ancient I can remember going to visit relatives in Tennessee when I was a little girl and seeing two entrances for the buildings. One side of the restaurants said white and one colored. I remember asking about it because we did not have them that way up here. The tour must have been so interesting Joe.

Betsy from Tennessee said...

Even though I was born in 1942, I never knew much about segregation.. We had a nice black family who lived across the street from us. My parents taught me that color didn't matter. I was one of the lucky ones.

I did experience segregation when I was an adult and went on a church retreat in Louisiana --where I lived at the time. One of my black friends went with the group and she was my room-mate. Anyhow we were staying in homes of members of this church in Alexandria, LA.

When we got to the home where Delores and I were supposed to stay, the white family wouldn't allow her to go inside of their home. I was SHOCKED.. This was in the mid-80's..... YIPES.

Thanks for sharing.
Betsy

Ann said...

brave woman, Rosa Park, how many women are like her?

Julie Magers Soulen said...

Thank you for sharing this important time in our history. I didn't realize that was today's date.

Cheers!
Julie
Julie Magers Soulen Photography

EG Wow said...

I enjoyed this post, Joe. Next Monday my MyWorld post is of the Freedom Crossing monument, one of the crossing spots for the Underground Railroad.

Tony Letts said...

hard not to laugh but too serious - every nation has things which shame it

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

Thank you for sharing this tour Joe. Sadly we missed it when we were in the area. (Bill sprained his ankle at Montpelier and was on crutches for a few days after that, so we spent a few days doing just car touring of the countryside.) On our list for if we ever go back. One of the places we toured on an earlier trip that made a huge impression on us was Selma Alabama, where we saw the Pettis Bridge, and the Museum about the March to Montgomery and the church where MLK started the march. It was heart-stopping to think of the history and the progress that has been made in our own lifetime.