Thursday, August 03, 2017

Hike the Bog Trail Cape Breton Highlands National Park of Canada…

MQTlogoa1500x500 Might as well do the Bog in the Fog…….LOL

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“A short accessible trail in Cape Breton Highlands National Park is the perfect example of what the terrain on top of the Highlands looks like; boggy!
A lot of people bypass this trail for the more exciting trails such as Skyline or Fishing Cove but this one offers a lot for such a short trail. First of all, at about 500m, it’s short so it’s perfect for anybody on the trip. It’s also on a raised boardwalk the whole way around so even in the pouring rain; your feet will be relatively dry.” READ MORE.. Thank you TrailPeak

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I wish I knew what 20675 means. Anyone have the answer?????

 DSC_0606 “A self guiding trail, signs explain life here – pitcher plants, delicate orchids, colorful dragonflies, green frogs and gigantic moose. The trail, as well as the privy at the trailhead, is wheelchair accessible. Ideal for baby strollers.” READ MORE

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Peat:: “Peat, also called turf, is an accumulation of partially decayed vegetation or organic matter that is unique to natural areas called peatlands, bogs, mires, moors, or muskegs.”

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DSC_0582Strange critters on the boardwalk.

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Some plants will do anything for nitrogen.

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“A common plant in the bogs of the northeastern part of North America is Sarracenia purpurea (pitcher plant, Although its large leaves resemble tall pitchers partially filled with water, they are also good mimics of flowers, and it is the latter trait that fools both insects and humans. Although humans have nothing to fear if they try to smell the false flowers, flies easily become victims of the pitfall trap when they seek potential food inside. As the summer season progresses, the leaves become purplish red from the presence of anthocyanins, making them a lure to flies who are probably also attracted by the decaying amino acid odor of already trapped prey. Once the fly enters the hollow leaf, it confronts a waxy surface leading to a pool of water. Although a fly can often escape the surface of water, the pitcher plant reduces its chances by supplying a wetting agent that wets the fly's wings and prevents it from flying. Even if the fly succeeds in escaping the surface of the water, it is confronted by the steep sides of the leaf and, being unable to fly straight up like a helicopter, is forced to crash into the walls of the leaf. We have all seen flies climb the walls of our houses, but this leaf wall is somewhat more challenging”. READ MORE

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Trapped in a Bog:::

“Paddy was trapped in a bog and seemed a goner when Big Mick O’Reilly wandered by.
“Help! ” Paddy shouted, “Oi’m sinkin’! ” Don’t worry, ” assured Mick. “Next to the Strong Muldoon, Oi’m the strongest man in Erin, and Oi’ll pull ye right out o’ there. ” Mick leaned out and grabbed Paddy’s hand and pulled and pulled to no avail. After two more unsuccessful attempts, Mick said to Paddy, “Shure, an’ Oi can’t do it. The Strong Muldoon could do it alone, mebbe, but Oi’ll have to get some help. ”
As Mick was leaving, Paddy called “Mick! Mick! D’ye think it will help if Oi pull me feet out of the stirrups? ”

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The trees around the edge of the bog are largely Tamarack (Larix laricina), one of the few deciduous conifers.

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Bogs and History:::

His name was Fleming, and he was a poor Scottish farmer. One day, while trying to make a living for his family, he heard a cry for help coming from a nearby bog. He dropped his tools and ran to the bog.
There, mired to his waist in black muck, was a terrified boy, screaming and struggling to free himself. Farmer Fleming saved the lad from what could have been a slow and terrifying death. The next day, a fancy carriage pulled up to the Scotsman's sparse surroundings. An elegantly dressed nobleman stepped out and introduced himself as the father of the boy Farmer Fleming had saved.
"I want to repay you," said the nobleman. "You saved my son's life. "No, I can't accept payment for what I did," the Scottish farmer replied, waving off the offer.
At that moment, the farmer's own son came to the door of the family hovel. "Is that your son?" the nobleman asked. "Yes," the farmer replied proudly.
"I'll make you a deal. Let me provide him with the level of education my own son will enjoy. If the lad is anything like his father, he'll no doubt grow to be a man we both will be proud of." And that he did.
Farmer Fleming's son attended the very best schools and in time, he graduated from St. Mary's Hospital Medical School in London, and went on to become known throughout the world as the noted Sir Alexander Fleming, the discoverer of Penicillin.
Years afterward, the same nobleman's son who was saved from the bog was stricken with pneumonia. What saved his life this time? Penicillin. The name of the nobleman? Lord Randolph Churchill.
His son's name? Sir Winston Churchill.

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DSC_0599DSC_0604 Now time to get back on our bikes and head for the next trail.

DSC_0631 Just kidding.. I know I don’t have that much energy…maybe Linda does… There were a number of biker/campers in Cape Breton Highlands National Park of Canada…

jta Have a great day..Actually this photo was taken on a different trail in the same general area… Cape Breton a “must see” in my opinion…

8 comments:

eileeninmd said...

Hello, this looks like an interesting hike. Beautiful place even in the fog and rain. The boardwalk trail looks easy. Love the "critter" photo.

Happy Monday, enjoy your day and new week!

Holly Myers said...

Interesting and beautiful. Anxious to travel back and see Cape Breton. Great post!

Jill Harrison said...

It looks like they have packed a lot into this short trail. Idea for families with small children and those needing wheelchair access, or those just passing through. Thanks for taking us there. I am visiting you from Our World Tuesday.

Mary K.- The Boondocks Blog said...

That was a very interesting read. It looks like a great place to go if you are brave. I would be too scared that something would jump out at me. Great photos and very informative.

NatureFootstep said...

thanks for sharing your NP. Seems a little like our land up north :) (Sweden)

Alexa T said...

Amazing place and such nice boardwalk trail to have a look around to the nature. Thank you for sharing!

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

I would love to go there! Enjoyed the tour so much. Beautiful park.

Linda Gross said...

I would walk this trail...just right for me--short with interesting sights along the way. We have a short boardwalk trail in a local state park. I walk the trail each time we visit the park. I love seeing the snakes, dragonflies, birds and turtles that share the trail with me.