Monday, July 14, 2014

Public Health Museum of Colonial Williamsburg

MQTlogoa ARE “THEY” AFTER YOU

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An insanely good time:: “A two-story brick institution south of Francis Street, Williamsburg's public hospital was founded at the urging of Governor Francis Fauquier (pronounced "Fau-keer"). Like many men of the 18th-century Enlightenment, Fauquier believed science could be employed to cure "persons who are so unhappy as to be deprived of their reason." READ MORE

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Linda and I just happened to stumble upon this museum on our way to the larger museums housed beyond the entrance. The DeWitt Wallace
Decorative Arts Museum & The Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum

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This hospital museum tells in a simple, and meaningful way the trials of caring for the mental illness during a time when little was really known about such a disease.

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“The building housed 24 cells, all designed for the security and isolation of their occupants. Each cell had a stout door with a barred window that looked on a dim central passage, a mattress, a chamber pot, and an iron ring in the wall to which the patient's wrist or leg fetters were attached.”

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“Things” are getting better

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‘Loony’ Lucy was committed to the Public Hospital When five men dragged her to the mental asylum, Lucy declared she would one day return to the Ludwell-Paradise house. She died in the asylum two years later, never returning to her home in the physical sense READ MORE

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ARE THEY” AFTER YOU YET?????

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There are  samples of the primitive treatment tools used on those found insane. Some of these are not for the weak hearted.

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“TREATMENTS OF THE TIME” By our standards, treatment was crude, aggressive and abusive. Powerful drugs were used to evacuate the bowels, induce constipation or cause vomiting. Other treatments included blistering salves, restraining devices such as manacles and the strait waistcoat or straitjacket, a plunge bath or dunking chair, a small electricity machine to administer shocks, scarificators [scalpel-like devises for bloodletting] and cups for bleeding.  Sometimes obstreperous patients were bound to chairs to quiet them.  Many doctors thought that a certain amount of intimidation would induce patients to reconsider their ways. On the positive side, inmates were fed, clothed and allowed time in the exercise yard -- also known as the “mad yard” – READ MORE The Madhouse of Colonial Williamsburg: An Interview With Shomer Zwelling (this is a really good link)………………………………………………………..  After all this you are probably hungry so take the time to stop at:::

museumThe Museum Café features a delectable array of sandwiches, chili, salads, and soups (vegetarian options also available) as well as teas, coffee, tavern beers, and wine.”

OLDMAN “THEY” FOUND ME… I MIGHT BE OUT OF CIRCULATION FOR AWHILE…. HAVE A GREAT DAY ANYHOW… LOL

For More:::: The Athens Lunatic Asylum

7 comments:

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

We missed this one, but have visited a medical museum with 'cures' for both physical and mental ailments that absolutely scare you to death. I want to say it was in Missouri, but I'm not sure ... have to check my travel notes which are somewhere else. Anyway, they make a person right down glad to not be living in the good old days" don't they!

Spare Parts and Pics said...

An interesting and scary history!

Pat @ Mille Fiori Favoriti said...

So little was known about mental illness back then, but at least an attempt was made to help them. Sometimes I wonder if if we should be doing more these days, as so many who need help, sadly don't get it.

Sandy Carlson said...

We have seen a lot at Williamsburg, but not this. Thanks for opening my eyes to some tough history.

ladyfi said...

WHat a cool place to visit.

Joyful said...

A very interesting post.

mun said...

Scary indeed!